FAB Classification of Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

Refractory anemia (RA).

  • Cytopenia of at least one lineage in the peripheral blood (usually anemia)

  • Normal or hypercellular bone marrow with dysplastic changes

  • Less than 1 percent blasts in the peripheral blood and less than 5 percent blasts in the bone marrow

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Diagnostic Criteria for Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVI)

Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a rare immune deficiency characterized by low levels of serum IgG, IgA, and/or IgM, with a loss of Ab production. The diagnosis is most commonly made in adults between the ages of 20 and 40 years, but both children and much older adults can be found to have this immune defect.  Continue reading

Diagnostic Criteria for Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome (HES)

Diagnostic Criteria for Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome (HES) are:

1. Persistent eosinophilia of over 1500/cubic millimeter for longer than 6 month;

2. Lack of evidence of other known causes of secondary hypereosinophilia (SH);

3. Multiple organ involvement.

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Diagnostic Criteria for HELLP Syndrome

The diagnosis of HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count) is based upon the presence of the characteristic laboratory findings in patients of appropriate gestational age. Imaging tests, particularly CT or MRI scanning, are useful when complications such as hepatic infarction, hematoma, or rupture are suspected.

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Clinical Conditions Associated with Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC)

Clinical Conditions Associated with Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC)

1. Sepsis/severe infection (any microorganism)

2. Trauma (e.g., polytrauma, neurotrauma, fat embolism)

3. Organ destruction (e.g., severe pancreatitis)

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Diagnostic Criteria for Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC)

Disseminated intravascular coagulation is a condition in which small blood clots develop throughout the bloodstream, blocking small blood vessels. The increased clotting depletes the platelets and clotting factors needed to control bleeding, causing excessive bleeding.
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Serum Levels That Differentiate Anemia of Chronic Disease from Iron-Deficiency Anemia

Iron deficiency anemia develops when body stores of iron drop too low to support normal red blood cell (RBC) production. Inadequate dietary iron, impaired iron absorption, bleeding, or loss of body iron in the urine may be the cause.
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