Classification of Neutrophilia

Primary (no other evident associated disease)

    • Hereditary neutrophilia
    • Chronic idiopathic neutrophilia
    • Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and other myeloproliferative diseases
    • Familial myeloproliferative disease
    • Congenital anomalies and leukemoid reaction
    • Leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD)
    • Familial cold urticaria and leukocytosis

Continue reading

Classification of Neutropenia

Acquired neutropenia

    • Postinfectious: varicella, measles, rubella, hepatitis A and B, mononucleosis, influenza, cytomegalovirus, parvovirus, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), S. aureus, brucellosis, tularemia, rickettsia, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, sepsis.
    • Drug induced: Antineoplastic agents, procainamide, antithyroid drugs, sulphasalazine, phenothiazines, semisynthetic penicillins, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, aminopyrine derivatives, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, gold compounds, sulfonamides, propranolol, dipyridamole, digoxin, acetyldigoxin, sulfamethoxizole, anticonvulsants
    • Benign familial neutropenia
    • Chronic benign neutropenia of childhood
    • Chronic idiopathic neutropenia
    • Autoimmune neutropenia
    • Isoimmune neutropenia
    • Neutropenia associated with immunologic abnormalities
    • Neutropenia associated with metabolic diseases
    • Neutropenia due to increased margination
    • Nutritional deficiency

Continue reading

FAB Classification of Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

Refractory anemia (RA).

  • Cytopenia of at least one lineage in the peripheral blood (usually anemia)

  • Normal or hypercellular bone marrow with dysplastic changes

  • Less than 1 percent blasts in the peripheral blood and less than 5 percent blasts in the bone marrow

    Continue reading

Diagnostic Criteria for Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVI)

Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a rare immune deficiency characterized by low levels of serum IgG, IgA, and/or IgM, with a loss of Ab production. The diagnosis is most commonly made in adults between the ages of 20 and 40 years, but both children and much older adults can be found to have this immune defect.  Continue reading

Diagnostic Criteria for Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome (HES)

Diagnostic Criteria for Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome (HES) are:

1. Persistent eosinophilia of over 1500/cubic millimeter for longer than 6 month;

2. Lack of evidence of other known causes of secondary hypereosinophilia (SH);

3. Multiple organ involvement.

Continue reading

Diagnostic Criteria for HELLP Syndrome

The diagnosis of HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count) is based upon the presence of the characteristic laboratory findings in patients of appropriate gestational age. Imaging tests, particularly CT or MRI scanning, are useful when complications such as hepatic infarction, hematoma, or rupture are suspected.

Continue reading